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Changes Ahead For Property Owners: After More Than 30 Years, Supreme Court Reopens Federal Courthouse Door To Property Rights Claims

June 28th, 2019 — In News & Events

Changes Ahead For Property Owners: After More Than 30 Years, Supreme Court Reopens Federal Courthouse Door To Property Rights Claims

OCA Member Robert Thomas seeks to alert all property owners in his recent posting on the impact of the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent landmark decision in Knick v. Township of Scott: Heads up, property owners: last week the U.S. Supreme Court issued a landmark ruling changing the way property rights lawsuits have been handled for the last thirty years. In Knick v. Township of Scott, the Court allowed property owners who sue to enforce their federal right to compensation because a municipal government has taken their property in violation of the U.S. Constitution’s Fifth Amendment by overregulating its use, to bring the lawsuit in federal court. You might reasonably ask: how could it be that since 1985, property owners who alleged a federalconstitutional violation were barred from suing in federal court? Well, the lawyers in our firm’s Land Use Practice Group who represent property owners in these type of cases had long asked the very same question. The details of why the Supreme Court—in the case Williamson County Regional Planning Commission v. Hamilton Bank (1985)—had barred federal takings plaintiffs from federal court are not terribly important, and it is sufficient to understand that until Knick, these kind of claims had to be raised exclusively in state court. No other federal constitutional right was subject to this requirement, only federal property rights. Williamson County assigned to state judges and state courts the exclusive responsibility for enforcing the federal constitutional right to own and use private property. In Knick, the Supreme Court revisited theWilliamson […]

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June 24th, 2019 — In Articles

Knick Analysis, Part I: After More Than 30 Years, Supreme Court Reopens The Federal Courthouse Door To Property Owners

Read OCA Member Robert Thomas’ take on the recent Knick decision in his blog entitled Inverse Condemnation here.

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June 24th, 2019 — In Uncategorized

More than a ‘Knick’—SCOTUS Overrules ‘Williamson County’ in Stunning Victory for Property Owners

Read OCA Member Dwight Merriam’s fascinating article in the Connecticut Law Tribune on the impact of the recent Knick decision on landowner property rights here.

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June 21st, 2019 — In News & Events

U.S. Supreme Court Decides Knick v. Township of Scott, And In Doing so Overturns the Williamson Doctrine

Congratulations to the Pacific Legal Foundation for winning a big property rights case today! In 2013, Rose Knick was forced to allow public access to a suspected gravesite on her ranch. Ms. Knick  sued over the unconstitutional property taking, but a federal court refused to hear her federal claim citing the 1985 Supreme Court decision Williamson County. Ms. Knick went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court  seeking to overturn this precedent so property rights would be treated the same as  other constitutional rights, like due process and free speech. In a major ruling announced today, the Supreme Court has agreed that the Williamson County precedent should be overturned. This is a major victory for property owners nationwide. OCA filed an Amicus Brief in the Knick case to support Ms. Knick’s legal position.

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June 12th, 2019 — In Articles

Awaiting ‘Knick’…Will SCOTUS Fix the Ripeness Mess?

The decision in an important takings case, Knick v. Township of Scott, Pennsylvania, reargued Jan. 16, is soon to be released. Be watching for it,… By Dwight Merriam | June 11, 2019. Read more.

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June 5th, 2019 — In News & Events

OCA Member Thor Hearne Files Another Rails to Trails Case

Thor Hearne, a parter at Larson O’Brien and perhaps the best known lawyer specializing in Rails to Trails litigation recently filed another lawsuit in the Federal Court of Claims on behalf of 150 landowners whose property is part of an eight-mile rail corridor that will be used to expand Sarasota’s “Legacy Trail.” Despite the fact that in the last 10 years the federal government has had to pay millions to property owners to convert railroad beds into recreational trails, the Department of Justice continues to fight these cases. “It’s crazy for DOJ to contest these cases,” Hearne said. “Why do they keep fighting them?” Great question.

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